Learning about Spices
What is a spice?
Why were spices important?
Sources of spices
Perfumes and Incenses 
Use of spices as aphrodisiacs
Use of spices as medicines
Culinary herbs
A spice timeline

Table of Spices
Allspice (Pimento)
Anise
Black Pepper
Cardamom
Cassia
Chile Pepper
Chocolate
Cinnamon
Clove
Coriander (Cilantro)
Cumin
Dill
Fennel
Fenugreek
Frankincense and Myrrh
Galangal
Garlic
Ginger
Horseradish
Licorice
Mustard
Nutmeg and Mace
Onion
Saffron
Sugar
Sumac
Tamarind
Turmeric
Vanilla

Contacts and Acknowledgments
Common Name DILL DILL
Click image to enlarge
Genus SpeciesAnethum gravelans
FamilyApiaceae
Origin Southern Europe and Western Asia
Cultivated India, North and South America
  
  
  
  
  
Description The name dill may arise from a Norse word, suggesting “lull”; however, there is no evidence of a lulling or soporific, sedative effect of this spicy herb. It is often used as a condiment in European cooking; it is combined with pickled vegetables and is used in fish sauces and in soups. See a list of spices by Taste and Hotness.
Useful Parts Dill seeds are used, as well as the dried leaves, and fresh leaves.
Medicinal Properties Medically, it is extremely popular as “gripe water” in Europe, where it is used to relieve colic in babies. It is also used as a digestant and to relieve mild bowel disorders in general. There is nothing to support its long-time use for more significant effects, such as stimulating the flow of milk or as a charm against withchraft.
See chemicals in spices.
Historical View “It possesses, like the fruits of the anise, caraway, fennel, and other aromatic unbelliferous fruits, stimulant, carminative, and aromatic properties; and like anise, it is popularly supposed to promote the secretion of milk. In the form of dill water, etc., it is a common domestic remedy to relieve the flatulence and griping of infants; it is also frequently employed by the medical practitioner as a vehicle for the exhibition of purgative and other medicines to children.”

Bentley, Robert and Henry Trimen. Medicinal Plants; being descriptions with original figures of the principal plants employed in medicine and an account of the characters, properties, and uses of their parts and products of medicinal value. London, Churchill, 1880. (WZ 295 B556m 1880)
DILL
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Spice Exhibit URL: http://unitproj.library.ucla.edu/biomed/spice/index.cfm

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